Nothing Could be Finer than to Honor Lynn Reiner

When anyone mentions ORT to Lynn Reiner, and people often do, they are likely (and lucky) to catch her infectious enthusiasm and passion for ORT and all things related to elevating education. Lynn’s unique presence leaves a profound and indescribable impact on the people, places and things she touches. This is certainly true for ORT on a global and national scale as well as here in the Metropolitan Chicago Region. She has been unwavering in her dedication to ORT for more than 36 years.

Continue reading “Nothing Could be Finer than to Honor Lynn Reiner”

Self-proclaimed experts: You okay?

In the past few weeks, I have been catapulted into pondering what being an expert really means (to me), and why I have never held the opinion that I am an expert on or in anything.  Continue reading “Self-proclaimed experts: You okay?”

When body dysmorphia lost its weight

One week ago, I had a personally significant experience while on a mostly blind, first date. I say, mostly blind, because we’d seen photos of each other, had spoken on the phone, but neither of us could recall ever meeting each other in person. We have many wonderful friends in common and certain career parallels where we might have met at some point long ago. If we did previously meet, neither of us made a noteworthy impression on each other.

For me, and unbeknownst to my date, I was about to have a phenomenal dating experience.

I arrived right on time for brunch. My date was already at the restaurant waiting for me. Approximately 38 seconds into the date, as we arrived at our table,  and even before my tush could make the”pffftt” sound that always happens when ANY tush hits the cushion of a seat in a booth, my date said, somewhat apologetically…

I’m usually attracted to slender, more petite women.

Continue reading “When body dysmorphia lost its weight”

The Concussion,the Head Trip & WHY?

My eldest daughter, Juliette, suffered a concussion yesterday. She tripped in the school locker room in total darkness. The power suddenly went out in the entire school, and in the locker room, there are no windows. Her head hit a bench. This is her second concussion in less than two years. She seems fine, so I’m going with that. Continue reading “The Concussion,the Head Trip & WHY?”

Brad: A Walking Inspiration

Brad is the best example of WHY I love nonprofit work and philanthropy.

The following essay was written and submitted by my longtime friend, Brad Kolar. He is an inspiration to me and to so many others, I simply HAD to post it on my blog.

Enjoy.

Why I choose to be an “ORT man”

Written and submitted by Brad Kolar

My mom was an “ORT lady.” For those who didn’t grow up in an ORT household, that probably doesn’t mean a lot. However, for those of us who did, that was a big deal.

Continue reading “Brad: A Walking Inspiration”

West Side (Nonprofit) Story

For the love of driving a mission. PLAN. LISTEN. BREATHE. SING.

With an abundance of vim and vigor, I work in the nonprofit sector. As with much of my life, I tend to think in choreography, musical theatre and improv comedy sketches. No matter how long I’ve been out of the performing arts professionally, I still have an artist’s brain with an obsession for the implementation of logical and accessible systems. I am grateful for both sides of my brain.

I have known for more than a decade that the nonprofit sector is exactly where I belong. Whenever my Dad mentions, “Hey Honey, you can always go the corporate route again,” I smile, and sometimes, I even nod.

I thrived in the for profit sector for a few decades. I was so lucky to travel the world, earn a terrific living, engage with lovely people (mostly), and learn a great deal about a host of industries that have since changed dramatically. Growing up (hungry) in the performing arts for much of my life was helpful to my flourishing in the for profit sector. With a starving artist mentality, (because I wanted to be skinny, not because I didn’t have food), I showed up to each gig, grateful for the job, interested in learning, and excited to be around so much innovation. What sorely lacked for me while working in the corporate world, was the feeling that I wasn’t really doing enough to help humankind. The mere thought of collaborating with other like-minded people to move a nonprofit mission and organization forward, to make this world better, often led and STILL leads to thoughts of West Side Story and other musicals I’ve performed in and/or loved:

Something’s coming I don’t know what it is, but it is gonna be great!

When I’m in a meeting with executive leadership, or with a colleague who needs to feel more valued, or with a disappointed donor, or when I choose to eat humble pie, because I KNOW it’s what’s best for the collective good, it always helps to recall and celebrate my musical theatre roots.

When I entered (head/heart first), into the nonprofit world, I was immediately inspired:

Do you hear the people sing? Singing the songs of angry men? It is the music of the people who will not be slaves again! When the beating of your heart echoes the beating of the drums, there is a life about to start When tomorrow comes.

Will you join in our crusade? Who will be strong and stand with me? Somewhere beyond the barricade, is there a world you long to see?

les-miz
Lis Miserables: GREAT show, HEINOUS film.

Truth be told, the music from Les Miserables often plays in my head. Much to my dismay, I never performed in that show, but I was called back a bunch of times for Broadway and the National Tour. My singing wasn’t good enough, and I always knew that. I think I might have had nine callbacks, so I guess I didn’t completely suck. P.S. I guarantee that my Mom, Lois Klier, absolutely knows the exact amount of callbacks and what I wore at each one.

So, while I was undeniably inspired by nonprofit work, I made a shocking discovery:

nonprofits sometimes forget that they’re a business.

In the nonprofits I’ve had the honor of working for, as staff, as a consultant, and as a member of the board of directors, I have noticed a trend:

  • So many meetings, and meetings that are usually not well-organized and that last way too long
  • Poor planning or no planning with reactive rather than proactive actions. Passion for a mission is not enough. Planning is key
  • Too much reliance on gadgets and gizmos to help learn more about the organization’s donors and donor prospects. The best prospect research tool I’ve ever located, is having a conversation with the prospect, and doing more listening than talking. The relationship evolves from there
  • Too much work on staff members’ plates, but in actuality, prioritization is usually out of whack because systems have never been put into place
  • Enormous dependence on fundraising events with no plan for donor retention, post event.
  • Weak marketing – lack of clarity or connective tissue between the organizational mission and its marketing and communications materials
  • Not spending enough time on strengthening the case for support
  • Not celebrating victories. Even small milestones are worthy of a two-minute party. The mission and workload will still be there when you’re done. Praise the collaborative effort, praise your colleagues and leadership.
  • Inserting too much pressure on the Board of Directors and lay leadership for fundraising – THIS is not great cultivation and stewardship if your donor is uncomfortable doing something. It’s the staff’s job to craft a fundraising strategy that works well for the organization. Where do gracious volunteers want to go? What excites them? Have them do that. Support them and develop leaders
  • More than all I have listed above, nearly all of the nonprofits I have been involved with attract the very best, kindest and most talented human beings on the face of the Earth. It serves a nonprofit very well to raise already extraordinary people up, so that the organization has the strength to do what it’s there to do. Elevating people is at the heart of every mission I have ever seen, pondered or worked to move forward

Today, I don’t have to tell you that there is a great deal of fear, worry, anger and shock that is practically suffocating us. While I am not immune to the current climate, I have forced myself to implement a system of boundaries that help keep me free to do what I must do in order to make this world better.

I do fear really well, I just choose not to.

While wallets may tighten and nonprofit tax benefits might change, it doesn’t alter the fact that important nonprofit missions have to be carried out. I would argue, NOW MORE THAN EVER BEFORE.

And while I’m a pragmatist, I might also be a secret optimist. I do believe:

There’s a place for us, A time and place for us. Hold my hand and we’re halfway there. Hold my hand and I’ll take you there Somehow, Some day, Somewhere!

west-side-story-jets-vs-sharks
West Side Story

While the Jets and the Sharks in West Side Story, hated and sought to harm each other, they never really knew each other in the first place. Heartbreaking tragedy struck and that’s what it took for communities to come together. Tony and Maria were more evolved than their peers because they led with love. I choose to lead with love, especially within a storm of chaos.

And from the very first show that bit me in the tush, I urge anyone, even in such challenging times, to think:

When hardship must be faced;Life obliges us with hardship, so the words of wisdom shouldn’t go to waste. To us and our good fortune, be happy be healthy, long life! And if our good fortune never comes, here’s to whatever comes, drink l’chaim, to life! To life, to life, l’chai-im,! L’chai-im, l’chai-im, to life! Life has a way of confusing us, blessing and bruising us, drink l’chaim, to life, to life, l’chaim! L’chaim, l’chaim, to life! A gift we seldom are wise enough, ever to prize enough, drink l’chaim, to life!

fiddler-on-the-roof-2
Fiddler on the Roof

And l’chaim to a nonprofit’s life, and its organizational sustainability. Breathe, listen, pay attention, and please plan the exact moves (ahead of time), on how you’re going to safely get down from the roof without breaking your fiddle, and when you get down, you must already know how you will implement a system of collaboration for the entire community of Anatevka. You are a matchmaker. Make matches for your donors and the organization you work for or serve.

I have faith in you, and in human beings all over the globe. Happy Valentine’s Day.

You’re my favorite work of art.

babes-in-arms
Babes in Arms

If Loving You Is Wrong, I Don’t Want to Be Right: Career Polyamory

Originally written in August, 2016, and updated six months later,to reflect a positive shift in my professional trajectory. My professional path will shift again, with intention and by design.

My Mom has shared with me many times, that while I was growing up, she felt really sorry for me. She noticed I was living with a curse. I had so much passion, focus and commitment for such an expansive variety of things, she didn’t know how I would ever decide to choose just one of them to take me through my life professionally. She worried a lot about it. Continue reading “If Loving You Is Wrong, I Don’t Want to Be Right: Career Polyamory”